Recent Posts

Building a Labyrinth …

Building a Labyrinth …

I’m using this pattern here … and it’s much easier than I thought it would be. Labyrinthos is a website I found very helpful in figuring out how to do this project.

Hot Enough For Ya?

Hot Enough For Ya?

A recipe video I made with Allie and Ledge …  

Impressions

Impressions

impress: 1325–75; ME <>impressus ptp. of imprimere to press into or upon, impress, equiv. to im- + pressus ptp. of premere (comb. form -primere) to press
to press (a thing) into or on something.

to produce (a mark, figure, etc.) by pressure; stamp; imprint:

to apply with pressure, so as to leave a mark.

I love art journals. Or, rather, I love the idea of art journals. I’ve never been able to keep one. I get a few pages in and mess up a page or look back and want to change things around. But I need a place to put sketches and ideas … So, this is a flexible art journal that can be added to and changed at any time.

The covers of this journal are made of 1/8 inch thick, double sided masonite. I like this as a foundation for small paintings and it’s thin enough to work for covers, about the same thickness as book board and very smooth and sturdy. I’ve cut two pieces of this to approximately 5 x 7 in and drilled three holes in both to fit rings.

I covered most of the masonite with a thin coat of light modeling paste. This will hold impressions made with stamps or anything else. The depth of the stamp will determine how thick the modeling paste should be.

After letting this dry for about fifteen minutes or so, until it was just starting to harden on the surface, I used rubber and metal stamps dipped in water to stamp into the paste. Here, I’ve made this a quite subtle effect. But any stamp or any size can be used and thicker or thinner layers of paste.

Once dry, I sanded the impressed modeling paste and painted a few thin washes of magenta and turquoise, masking off the stripes with tape.

On a small, stretched canvas, the effect is more obvious because I’ve used larger stamps and a thicker layer of paste. The technique is the same … I used a palette knife to put on a thin coat of modeling paste (which will also act as a resist), allowed it to dry for fifteen minutes or so, then used stamps dipped in water.


Once fully dry, I sanded lightly and did a thin wash with quinacridone magenta.


Added some lime green stripes …


… and a silk screened moonflower.


I use this technique on large canvases to add text … and {imperfection} makes it unique. 

What kind of impression will you make?

Keeping Backyard Chickens … My Experience

Keeping Backyard Chickens … My Experience

My long journey to being vegan began, in part, by keeping chickens. Many years ago, I was living on about six acres in a rural area when I got the brilliant idea to get chickens. I devoted several months to reading about the care of […]

In the Pacman Garden

In the Pacman Garden

My grandkids were chasing each other in through the raised beds in the garden the other day and I thought, “Hey, this reminds me of something … what is it??” Then I realized … “Pacman! We’ve made a life sized Pacman maze!”    

Treadmill Desk

Treadmill Desk

It’s made of a few pieces of PVC and a board and fits over the treadmill. It works even better now that I use it with a laptop … 
I like it!

More About Heinz

More About Heinz

Here’s a bit of what I was able to learn about Heinz so far … Heinz Wertheim was born in Bremke, Germany, on June 26th 1921. He was a shoemaker and married Ruth Zeilnziger. They were deported together to the transit camp, Westerbork, near Assen, […]

An Update on Heinz and Ruth

An Update on Heinz and Ruth

I was able to contact the family of a woman who I though may have been the wife of Heinz Wertheim. Despite the extremely unusual last/maiden name (I could find only one Ruth Wertheim in the US), and that the two women have similar birth […]

The Name on the Postcard was Heinz

The Name on the Postcard was Heinz

And the story continues … 

I emailed back and forth with a very helpful researcher from Westerbork, who couldn’t find any record of a Henry Wertheim … so I sent a copy of the postcard, and it turns out that the first name on the card is actually Heinz.

They were able to tell me that Heinz Wertheim was a shoemaker apprentice who was born on June 26th, 1921 in Bremke, Germany. He married a Dutch girl named, Ruth Sara*, and they lived in the Netherlands and were sent together to Westerbork. They were so young. He would have been 22 and and she just 21.

In Westerbork, on May 6, 1943, they had a baby and named him Paul Freidrich.

The baby died six weeks later.

I just noticed that the postcard was written on May 5th 1943, the day before the baby was born, and postmarked May 8th, two days after. Perhaps they got money from someone outside Westerbork because they were expecting a baby (the postcard said, “Many thanks for the money you sent.”) … and I imagine Heinz wrote the card on the 5th, then was busy with the new baby and didn’t get a chance to mail the card until the 8th.

Shortly after the baby died, on September 14, 1943, Heinz and Ruth were sent together to Auschwitz.

Heinz died at Monowitz, which was a labor camp at Auschwitz, on December 12, 1944, after surviving there for more than a year. He was 23. His wife, Ruth, survived Auschwitz and was sent to Ravensbruck and then Malchow, a subcamp of Ravensbruck. She survived the death marches from Ravensbruck before being liberated in Neustadt.

A Postcard from Henry

A Postcard from Henry

*This is a story that started, for me, several years ago when I bought this postcard. I’d like to share how it’s unfolded up to today … This is how it begins. “I have a suitcase full of these cards,” the dealer said. I bought […]